Featured "In Danger" Artist: Paschalis Dougalis

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 “Indian Rhino”

“Indian Rhino”

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It all started for Paschalis Dougalis with a rooster, his first sketch at the age of four. Growing up in a small village surrounded by animals, both domestic and wild, he came to appreciate the beauty of nature early on. This appreciation has extended through both his personal and professional lives, including establishing himself as an award-winning nature artist. He originally went to school for theology to paint religious icons but abandoned this, in part thanks to a guide to English birds that inspired him artistically. Paschalis works primarily in watercolor and gouache.

Paschalis aims to not only capture the representation of a species in each piece but also to imbue each one with its own personality and life. He describes art as his personal interpretation of life and is trying to be as true as possible to every life form.

Here are Paschalis’ beautiful contributions to In Danger:

 “Soul of the Prairie”

“Soul of the Prairie”

“Grouses, wild chicken birds with feathered legs, are widespread across Northern hemisphere, and are definitely one of my favorites. I always wanted to paint one since I saw the stunning “Sagebrush Sea” documentary. I haven’t observed them in the wild yet, but films helped me to understand the attitude of the birds.” - Paschalis Dougalis

 “Kazaringa Knight”

“Kazaringa Knight”

“The one-horned rhino is an animal I know pretty well. I’ve sketched and painted it from life many times at the Munich’s Hellabrunn Zoo, and I couldn’t resist to choose it when I saw it on the list.” - Paschalis Dougalis

 “Swamp Ghost”

“Swamp Ghost”

“Nobody knows for sure if the Ivory billed woodpecker still exists, but this enigmatic species has always fascinated me since I read about it; this fascination keeps the hope alive, that it’s still somewhere in the woods.” - Paschalis Dougalis

 “The Fading Blue”

“The Fading Blue”

“I was happily surprised to see the Spix Macaw on the list. Extinct in the wild but still exists and breeds in captivity. The species is named after Spix, a Bavarian scientist who discovered it first in North-eastern Brazil in early 19th century. He was the founder of the Zoological collection in Munich, the city I live! I’ve been studying the species from taxidermy mounts and videos during the last two years, and hope to sketch this bird from life someday!” - Paschalis Dougalis

Learn more about Paschalis Dougalis


The “In Danger” Book

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Please consider supporting Expedition Art’s Kickstarter to help self-publish “In Danger”, so we can provide as much funding to SavingSpecies as possible AND continue to create beautiful art for the next projects!

Learn more about who Expedition Art is and why they think art can be a driving force for change in the struggle for animal and environmental conservation.

PARTNERS

  Video storytelling courtesy of Tiburon Transmedia.    Learn how they can tell YOUR story.

Video storytelling courtesy of Tiburon Transmedia.

Learn how they can tell YOUR story.


  Thanks to Imagination International for their incredible support in publishing “In Danger”!    Learn more about Imagination International

Thanks to Imagination International for their incredible support in publishing “In Danger”!

Learn more about Imagination International